E-ISSN 2667-8721

Predictors of Early And Late Mortality in Multitrauma Patients

Abstract

Trauma-related deaths are the third most common cause of death in all age groups, following cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Predicting mortality and morbidity is of vital importance for patient survival while evaluating trauma patients with a multidisciplinary approach, who account for a significant number of emergency admissions. This study aimed to investigate the parameters that may affect early (24 hours) mortality due to multitrauma. The mean RTS of the early deaths (n: 49) was 3.11 ± 2.19 and that of the late deaths was 5.32 ± 1.78; the ratio was statistically significant (p < 0.0001). The mean ISS of the early deaths (n: 49) was 59 ± 17.85 and that of the late deaths was 36.16 ± 12.43; the ratio was statistically significant (p < 0.0001).The mean admission APACHE II score of the early deaths was 27.22 ± 6.78 years; the ratio was statistically significant (p < 0.0001). The mean lactate values were 6.63 ± 3.43 for the early deaths and 3.98 ± 2.87 for the late deaths in late deceased patients and the difference was statistically significant. The mean base deficit (BD) of the early deaths was 11.5 ± 7.06 and that of the late deaths was -5.10 ± 7.15, thereby leading to a statistically significant difference (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, the GCS score, RTS, ISS, and APACHE II score are reliable to use for mortality prediction and high lactate and BD levels can also be used in early mortality prediction. We believe that aggressive treatment may make a positive contribution to survival in patients with high lactate and BD values.

Keywords: Predictors, Mortality



Eurasian J Critical Care 2019; 1 (4):135-138
Original Article