E-ISSN 2667-8721

Central Nervous System Infections in the Intensive Care Units and Risk Factors for Mortality; Retrospective Study

Aim: This study was designed to analyze demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics beside risk factors that affect the mortality rate of patients hospitalized in ICUs with diagnosis of CNS infection.

Methods: Patients that have been hospitalized at ICU on pre-CNS infection were retrospectively studied. Beside the clinical laboratory characteristics of the patients, mortality rate and risk factors that affect the mortality were recorded to be analyzed later.

Results: Following the evaluation of 118 ICU patients who were suspected to have CNS infection, 62 of them, with full diagnosis of CNS infection, were included in the study. Bacterial meningitis was the diagnosis for 40 (66%) of these patients while 18 of the total (30%) was diagnosed with viral encephalitis and 3 of them (4%) was diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis. When these factors were investigated in a multivariable study, age and time from the onset of symptoms to hospital admission were independent risk factors (CI: 1,098(1,031-1,169), 1,614(1,037-1,278).

Conclusion: The mortality rate of the patients that were subjects of the study was 52,5%. Age and time from the onset of symptoms to hospital admission were independent risk factors that affect the mortality.

Key words: Intensive Care, Meningitis, Encephalitis,


Eurasian J Critical Care 2021; 3 (1):1-6
Original Article